How Does the Sodium-Glucose Pump Work? (And Other Questions)

How Does the Sodium-Glucose Pump Work? (And Other Questions)

In this blog post, we answer salt-related questions often asked by dysautonomia patients. Read to learn about the kidneys, the sodium-glucose pump and potassium intake. Many dysautonomia patients and their caretakers can remember the day of their diagnosis. Beyond the emotional impact of learning about the presence of a chronic disease, the term “dysautonomia” usually breeds curiosity because it is not well-known within the medical community. Understanding some of the science behind dysautonomia and the treatments commonly recommended can help. One of the most important treatments recommended by doctors to most (but not all) dysautonomia patients is to increase salt intake. Salt intake is can be more efficient when the salt is combined with a bit of sugar in the form of glucose, because of the sodium-glucose pump. How does the sodium-glucose pump work? Put simply, the sodium-glucose pump describes the way cells use salt ions to absorb glucose. The...
SaltStick - Mar 13, 2018
SaltStick Continues to be an Industry Leader for Clean Products and Banned Substance Testing

SaltStick Continues to be an Industry Leader for Clean Products and Banned Substance Testing

For at least the second time this year, there have been announcements that professional triathletes have tested positive for banned substances, and we want continue to reassure our customers and athletes that SaltStick products have been banned-substance-free since our start, more than 11 years ago.This month, a professional triathlete announced on Facebook a positive test for ostarine, a banned substance under the WADA code. The athlete alleges that further investigation has found the ostarine was due to contaminated salt supplements, although the athlete did not publicly name the supplement company for legal reasons.We wish to emphatically confirm that the product containing ostarine was neither SaltStick Caps nor any SaltStick-branded product.The risk of contamination by banned substances of nutritional supplements remains an ongoing concern, not just for professional athletes, but all athletes concerned about their health and wellbeing. However, measures can be put in place by concerned manufacturers, such as SaltStick,...
SaltStick - Dec 21, 2017
The scientific reasons why Holiday food tastes so good

The scientific reasons why Holiday food tastes so good

If you have ever wondered why you cannot seem to get enough of that sweet potato pie, this blog post is for you. There is something special about holiday food. Yams, oven-roasted, and decorated with brown sugar and cranberries. Green beans, minced and boiled in white sauce. Ham, glazed and cooked to a juicy tenderness, cut in thin slices for you to enjoy. Is your mouth watering yet? Meals throughout the year are certainly delicious, but for some reason, during the months of November and December, food seems to taste so much better. Instinctively, we know that fats, sugars and salts are pleasant to eat. We also know that spending time in the company of other people allows for relaxation and pleasant memories. The Holidays are special in that they combine all of the above into a perfect cocktail of good times. Add a little egg nog, and things really...
SaltStick - Dec 20, 2017
Stress and salt intake: Is there a connection?

Stress and salt intake: Is there a connection?

Research links increased salt consumption with lower stress rates. But is this an excuse to reach for the salt shaker every time we feel anxious? Our tongue is sensitive to several flavors, including sweetness, sourness, savoriness and saltiness. To scientists, many of these pre-disposed cravings make sense when viewed in the context of evolutionary biology. For example, sweetness is usually a guarantee that a plant is non-poisonous, and savoriness tends to indicate high fat content, which provides an ample supply of calories for hunting and gathering. Saltiness, on the other hand, does not provide as many obvious benefits to justify cravings, and some researchers have begun to wonder why humans find it so appealing. “You might think people eat salt because it tastes good. But the deeper question is: Why do we love the stuff?” Professor Emeritus Micah Leshem, a biopsychologist at the University of Haifa’s Department of Psychology, said...
SaltStick - Nov 27, 2017
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